49. Indium - Elementymology & Elements Multidict

Elementymology & Elements Multidict

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49
Indium
Indium – Indium – Indium – Indio – インジウム – Индий – 銦
In
Multilingual dictionary

Indo-European
Indium Latin

— Germanic
Indium Afrikaans
Indium Danish
Indium German
Indium English
Indium Faroese
Indium Frisian (West)
Indín Icelandic
Indium Luxembourgish
Indium Dutch
Indium Norwegian
Indium Swedish

— Italic
Indio Aragonese
Indiumu Aromanian
Indiu Asturian
Indi Catalan
Indio Spanish
Indium French
Indi Friulian
Indio Galician
Indio Italian
Índi Lombard
Indi Occitan
Índio Portuguese
Indiu Romanian - Moldovan

— Slavic
Индий [Indij] Bulgarian
Indij[um] Bosnian
Iндый [indyj] Belarusian
Indium Czech
Indij Croatian
Jind Kashubian
Индиум [Indium] Macedonian
Ind Polish
Индий [Indij] Russian
Indium Slovak
Indij Slovenian
Индијум [Indijum] Serbian
Iндій [indij] Ukrainian

— Baltic
Indis Lithuanian
Indijs Latvian
Ėndis Samogitian

— Celtic
Indiom Breton
Indiwm Welsh
Indiam Gaelic (Irish)
Indiam Gaelic (Scottish)
Indjum Gaelic (Manx)
Eyndyum Cornish

— Other Indo-European
Ινδιο [indio] Greek
Ինդիում [indium] Armenian
Indium[i] Albanian

— Indo-Iranian/Iranian
Îndiyûm Kurdish
Индий [Indij] Ossetian
Индий [Indi'] Tajik

— Indo-Iranian/Indo-Aryan
ইন্ডিয়াম [inḍiẏāma] Bengali
ایندیم [ayndym] Persian
ઇન્ડિયમનો [inḍiyamano] Gujarati
इण्डियम [iṇḍiyama] Hindi

Finno-Ugric
Indium Estonian
Indium Finnish
Indium Hungarian
Индий [Indij] Komi
Индий [Indij] Mari
Инди [indi] Moksha
Indium Võro

Altaic
İndium Azerbaijani
Инди [Indi] Chuvash
Индий [indij] Kazakh
Индий [Indij] Kyrgyz
Инди [indi] Mongolian
İndiyum Turkish
ئىندىي ['indiy] Uyghur
Indiy Uzbek

Other (Europe)
Indioa Basque
ინდიუმი [indiumi] Georgian

Afro-Asiatic
انديوم [indiyūm] Arabic
אינדיום [indium] Hebrew
Indju[m] Maltese

Sino-Tibetan
Yîn (銦) Hakka
インジウム [injiumu] Japanese
인듐 [indyum] Korean
อินเดียม [indiam] Thai
Indi Vietnamese
[yin1 / yan1] Chinese

Malayo-Polynesian
Indyo Cebuano
Indium Indonesian
Indium Māori
Indium Malay

Other Asiatic
ഇന്‍ഡിയം [inḍiyam] Malayalam
இந்தியம் [intiyam] Tamil

Africa
Indu Lingala
Indiamo Sesotho
Indi Swahili

North-America
Indio Nahuatl

South-America
Indyu Quechua

Creole
Indimi Sranan Tongo

Artificial
Indio Esperanto

New names
Indion Atomic Elements
Vitaminium Dorseyville
memory peg

Very soft, very reflective metal which holds its shine. (Can be cut with a knife)
melting point 157 °C; 314 °F
boiling point 2080 °C; 3776 °F
density 7.31 g/cc; 456.35 pounds/cubic foot
1863 Ferdinand Reich and Hieronymus Theodor Richter, Germany
named after the indigo blue spectral stripe

History & Etymology

Indium Bars Indium was discovered in 1863, by the physics professor Ferdinand Reich (1799-1882) and his assistant Hieronymus Theodor Richter (1824-1898) at the Freiburg School of Mines (note), while they were checking sphalerite, a sulphide ore of Zinc, with a spectrograph looking for Thallium (which was discovered in 1861). Reich, who was colourblind, was assisted by Richter for the spectral analysis. After several attempts, Reich obtained a precipitate that he knew to be a sulfide of an unknown element. He used than several spectrographic techniques to identify the new element.

Richter observed a bright blue stripe, unknown in any other spectrum and distinct from the blue stripe of Cesium. To this new element was given the name Indium because of the bright indigo blue spectral stripe. The pigment indigo, earlier indico, comes from Latin indicum, the Indian substance or dye. The Sanskrite name was nih, from nila, dark blue, and this through Arabic al-nil, annil, gives "aniline".

Native indium is extremely rare under natural conditions and only of scientific interest. Metallic indium was first obtained in 1867 by T. Richter.
Chemistianity 1873
NTYAN
INDIUM, a cousin german to Zinc,
Is a soft, white, highly lustrous metal,
Like Platinum in colour. 'Tis ductile,
And will mark paper or receive a polish.

Further reading

  • Mary Elvira Weeks, Discovery of the Elements, comp. rev. by Heny M. Leicester (Easton, Pa.: Journal of Chemical Education, 1968), pp. 613-620.


Sources Index of Persons Index of Alleged Elements